Everett K. Ross as Mephisto? Positioning in Christopher Priest’s Black Panther

In the previous post, I wrote about the narrative point-of-view (pov) in Christopher Priest's Black Panther (1998-2003). There, I discussed Priest's comments about placing Everett K. Ross as the narrator of Black Panther and how that narrative position related to the work of Quentin Tarantino. Today, I want to look at a shift that occurs in issue #34, part one of "Gorilla Warfare." Ross' narrative voice remains; however, his appearance changes, and that change positions Ross as the Other in the text.

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Everett K. Ross “Emperor of Useless White Boys” in Christopher Priest’s Black Panther

Over the past few weeks, I have been working my way through Christopher Priest’s Black Panther (1998-2003). There are numerous aspects of Priest’s run that could, and should, be discussed; however, I want to focus on one aspect that I have been looking at in other works as well, the narrative point-of-view (pov). For Black Panther, Priest chose to convey the story from the pov from the perspective of Everett K. Ross, Special Attaché for the Office of the Chief of Protocol. Ross is white, and as such, he views the actions of T’Challa and other Wakandans from a specific pov. Today, I want to briefly explore the use of Ross as narrator in Black Panther.

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Luke Cage, Stagolee, and the Importance of Myth

Mike Benson and Adam Glass’ Luke Cage Noir (2009-2010) pulls from a Noir aesthetic full of femme fatales, double crosses, and private eyes all within Prohibition Era Harlem. The story turns Luke Cage into a Noir protagonist that struggles with life outside of prison, ultimately killing himself at the end of issue #4. It is Luke Cage’s suicide that struck me in this story, and it is here that I want to focus this post. By killing himself, Luke Cage becomes a symbolic myth to the community as a whole, a myth that provides hope and strength to those stuck in a cycle of economic and violent oppression.

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