Intimacy and Hope in Duffy and Jennings’ Adaptation of Butler’s “Kindred”

The last time I read Damian Duffy and John Ira Jennings’ graphic novel adaptation of Octavia Butler’s Kindred (1979), I zeroed in on the ways that Jennings represents faces and emotion in the text, specifically through Dana, Sarah, and Rufus. In this read through, I noticed the multiple panels with hands, either embracing, playing, or in confrontation. Today, I want to take a moment and look at some of these panels.

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Music in Nate Powell’s Work

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A couple of years ago, I picked up Jim Demanokas, Mark Long, and Nate Powell’s The Silence of Our Friends from the local library. Immediately, Powell’s black and white illustrations caught my attention, and I moved on to the March trilogy (John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, and Powell). Again, Powell’s artwork brought emotion to the page with his moving images. I have written about some of these images before, specifically the panels depicting the Freedom Riders’ arrival in Montgomery, AL. There, I write, “In these panels, Nate Powell’s black and white artwork . . . juxtaposes and plays with our general connotations of white and black.”  This juxtaposition is what initially drew me to Powell’s work.

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The Avengers and Interracial Intimacy: Part 2

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Last post, I started talking about the relationship between Wanda Maximoff (Scarlet Witch) and the Vision as a metaphor for interracial intimacy during the early 1970s, only five years removed from the Supreme Court decision in Loving v. Virginia. Today, I want to finish up that discussion by looking at Avengers #113, an issues where a group of terrorists known as the Living Bombs attack Vision because they do not like the fact that he is in a relationship with Wanda.

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