The Avengers and Interracial Intimacy: Part 2

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Last post, I started talking about the relationship between Wanda Maximoff (Scarlet Witch) and the Vision as a metaphor for interracial intimacy during the early 1970s, only five years removed from the Supreme Court decision in Loving v. Virginia. Today, I want to finish up that discussion by looking at Avengers #113, an issues where a group of terrorists known as the Living Bombs attack Vision because they do not like the fact that he is in a relationship with Wanda.

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Interracial Intimacy and “A Little Stranger!”

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Over the past year, I have written about Al Feldstein and Wallace Wood’s EC Comics’ stories, specifically their realistic “preachies” that sought to counter racism and prejudice. Within these stories, they tackle interracial intimacy and the unfounded fears surrounding the hate some feel at these relationships. Specifically, they use “Under Cover,” The Whipping!,” and “Blood Brothers” to show that the fears surrounding people’s prejudices around interracial intimacy are nothing more than concocted fantasies meant to perpetrate fear and to maintain power. In “The Whipping!,” as Ed prepares to enter the house of his daughter’s Mexican-American boyfriend and attack him, the narrator details Ed’s psyche by proclaiming, “The middle-aged man . . . the slightly balding one . . . the man with the grim face, now hidden behind the white mask . . . the one called Ed . . . the perpetrator . . . the creator of the fantasy . . . stepped forward, unrolling his strap.”

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The Continued Importance of “X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills”

Recently, someone suggested I take a look at Chris Claremont and Brent Eric Anderson’s X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills (1982). After reading, I came away noting the number of similarities between the 36 year old graphic novel and the present moment. In an interview on the 35th anniversary of its publication, Claremont and Anderson, along with interviewer Alex Abad-Santos, talk about the correlations between God Loves, Man Kills and the present moment.  Today, I want to look at the book and pull out some specific scenes that, sadly, still feel very much relevant to our current cultural moment.

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